Category Archives for "Producing!"

My Favorite Pickle ~ A Fermentation Workshop with Jodi Peters – July 2, 2017

Welcome to the wondrous world of fermentation with Jodi Peters, fermentation addict! Leading with our noses, this workshop will ensure that you learn how to make delicious and nutritious fermented vegetables. You will create and taste two different tried and true recipes, a dilly cauliflower/carrot pickle and basic sauerkraut (with some fun optional additions!). Each participant will take home their own small batches. Jodi will go over the basic utensils required, as well as show off some of the more specialized fermentation tools she’s acquired over the years. She will cover the common (and uncommon) errors that may arise, and give participants a science-based, historically informed overview of the fermentation process. As a bonus, we’ll make a batch of water kefir (and taste some special brews), and the first 5 participants can take home water kefir grains as well. Fermentation is a practice, and the best way to learn it is to watch and do.

Linnaea Farm Education Centre, July 2nd , 11am – 2:30pm

$50

Click here to register!

Get your seeds!

Seeds have been grown on Linnaea Farm for as long as anyone can remember.  They have always been traded and passed on.  The seeds offered here are some of our very favorite, grown on Linnaea Farm for years, and are perfectly adapted to our Pacific Northwest climate

Click here to see what we have to offer!

 

My Favorite Pickle ~ A Fermentation Workshop

Welcome to the wondrous world of fermentation with Jodi Peters, fermentation addict! Leading with our noses, this workshop will ensure that you learn how to make delicious and nutritious fermented vegetables. You will create and taste two different tried and true recipes, a dilly cauliflower/carrot pickle and basic sauerkraut (with some fun optional additions!). Each participant will take home their own small batches. Jodi will go over the basic utensils required, as well as show off some of the more specialized fermentation tools she’s acquired over the years. She will cover the common (and uncommon) errors that may arise, and give participants a science-based, historically informed overview of the fermentation process. As a bonus, we’ll make a batch of water kefir (and taste some special brews), and the first 5 participants can take home water kefir grains as well. Fermentation is a practice, and the best way to learn it is to watch and do.

Linnaea Farm Education Centre, July 2ndnd , 11am – 2:30pm

$50

Click here for more information or to register!

 

Eggs

Today when i went out to the chicken coop to collect eggs, i found this beautiful little nugget.  The very first egg a chicken has laid.  It’s like a gift.  A very precious, tiny gift.  Like when you are walking along the path and find a robin’s egg, shell cracked, and look above you to see if you can spot the nest way up above you.

Check out these facts about chickens and eggs:

 

  • A female chick is born with thousands of tiny ova, which are undeveloped yolks. Once she reaches maturity, an ovum will be released into a canal called the oviduct and begin its journey of development.
  • At any given time a productive hen will have eggs of several stages within her reproductive system. The eggs most recently discharged from the ovary are just tiny yolks, and the eggs farther down the oviduct are progressively larger and more developed.
  • From the time an ovum leaves the ovary, it takes approximately 25 hours for the egg to reach the vent for laying. During that time period, the yolk will grow larger while being surrounded by albumen (egg white), wrapped in a membrane, and encased in a shell. Pigment is deposited on the shell as the last step of the egg production process.
  • If sperm is present, the yolk will be fertilized before the albumen is deposited.
  • As a chick embryo develops in a fertilized egg, the yolk provides nourishment and the albumen cushions the embryo.
  • Although a hen has only one exterior opening (the cloaca or vent) for egg laying and elimination, eggs are not contaminated during the laying process. Two separate channels, the oviduct and the large intestine, open into the cloaca. As the egg nears the end of the oviduct, the intestinal opening is temporarily blocked off. The egg passes through the cloaca without contact with waste matter.
  • The typical interval between eggs laid is about 25 hours, so a hen that lays an egg every day will lay a bit later each day.
  • Hens don’t usually lay eggs in the dark, so once a hen’s laying cycle reaches dusk time, she will usually not lay till the following morning.

No doubt they make so much noise when they are laying eggs!  I’m so thankful for the fresh eggs that we are provided with from our chickens.  A great animal to start with if you are interested in getting into livestock!

IMG_1520  IMG_4317

 

 

And the garden keeps on giving

It’s almost the end of October, and I can’t believe that we are still eating 4lb cauliflowers out of the garden!  I’m not sure for how much longer, as the darkness that was still covering the fields when i awoke this morning, reminded me that it is indeed autumn.  The leaves are changing color, alighting the sky with beautiful hues of yellow and red, the mists are settling on the fields, and surprise me when they lift, leaving a bright, sun filled sky.  I was reminded of one of my favorite poems recently that i’d like to share here.

Happy autumn, may the stillness inspire you!

 

John Keats (1795-1821)

TO AUTUMN.

1.

SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.

2.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drows’d with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.

3.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies

 

Can it up!

I tend to approached canning with suspicion. I enjoy fermentation and dehydration infinitely more, in part because they are steeped in thousand-year plus ethnic traditions, and more so, because they retain (or create) more nutrients and offer health benefits. And yet, I can’t quite match the glowing satisfaction I feel when I line up my jars of canned goods in my pantry – they are simply gorgeous – and shelf stable! On an island where winter power outages are the norm, my home canned salmon sits smugly, while their frozen counterparts melt in the freezer and my fermentations get super bubbly and blow their lids!

Because canning is a modern invention, I feel it’s wise to look to scientifically tested best practices for safe canning. Here are some of the most important points to get you safely started on your journey to canning bliss:

-Botulism food poisoning is the biggest risk associated with home preserving. But avoiding it is simple. Botulism spores are killed by temperatures reached in a pressure canner (higher than boiling water), or botulism spores are completely suppressed in an acidic environment (pH<4.6)

– Low acid foods (pH >4.6) MUST be acidified OR canned in a pressure canner (e.g. green beans – you can make dilly green beans, acidified by the additions of a vinegar brine and can them in a boiling water bath. Or, you can can plain green beans in water, but use a pressure canner

-For a great list of low acid food (including some fruits!) visit http://pickyourown.org/food_acidity.htm

-Use tested recipes, do not assume you can safely can your favorite family recipe.

-No need to add tons of sugar to jam anymore – No-Sugar Needed pectin is available

-Use the finest fruits and vegetables for canning. Dehydrate less than optimal or overripe fruit.

An amazing food preservation resource is the National Center for Home Food Preservation

http://nchfp.uga.edu/

 

Plants oh sweet plants!

The smell of spring!  The birds are back, the grass is growing, and we are roasting radishes over the fire, moving cows through fields, and they are thanking us by producing the most amazing, creamy milk!  The slugs are coming at us in numbers unseen in previous years, alas, we sacrifice our tender greens to their insatiable appetites…

We continue on in our pursuit of a full greenhouse of glorious plants awaiting their position in the garden, the cloche moved to it’s summer position, peas staked in the garden, and will we get our potatoes in?  If the rain stops for a wee bit, our plan for Saturday will stay the same, get our storage potatoes in the ground.  The fine line between seasons.

I was read the poem below and felt that it need to be shared.  It’s by E.E. Cummings.

 

 

 

 

sweet spontaneous

earth how often have

the doting fingers of prurient philosophers
pinched and poked thee,
has the naughty thumb of science prodded thy beauty,
how often have religions
taken thee upon their scraggy knees
squeezing and buffeting thee
that thou mightest conceive gods
(but true to the incomparable couch of death
thy rhythmic lover thou
answerest them only
with spring)
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IMG_4326Tomatoes

 

roasted radish

Cheese please!

With a little more time on my hands, i found the art of cheese making to be a pleasing one.  From the hard working women on this farm who milk Jazzy, our beautiful Jersey cross cow, i receive buckets of fresh milk that i turn into an amazing cultured cheese. Raw, unpasturized milk makes the most amazing flavored cheese. However it takes alot of milk to make a little bit of cheese. And what does one do with all the whey? IMG_3197 IMG_3199 IMG_2899

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